Wood Piles Gone Wild

They’re a public art display, a personal flight of fancy and an out-of-the-ordinary way to store and display a winter’s worth of stacked wood. These extreme wood stacks are made by skilled and artistic people from all over the world, but they share a common desire to celebrate the beauty of wood and its ability to transform from a bunch of basic hard cylinders to a show-stopping display. Here are some of the best examples of creative wood stacking from around the globe.

Round it Out
Pictured above, this wood orb is the work of artist and blogger Michael Buck, a retired art teacher from Oxfordshire, England, who says, “I used to paint landscapes now I make them. The only thing that really needs doing is farming, with a little bit of building.” {source}

What a Wingspan

This wooden mosaic is the creation of Gary Tallman of Montana, who sorts his firewood by color each spring and builds his stack in the months that follow. {source}

Fallen Trees make a Fallen Tree

On Hornby Island in Canada’s British Columbia, Alastair Heseltine crafts his split logs into a recreation of their source. {source}

From the Land of the Midnight Sun

Norwegian Ole Kristian Kjelling is a retired engineer who has become famous for his woodpile portraits. Norway’s Queen Sonja and King Harald V, below, are a recent creation. {source}

“It Was Thiiiiiis Big!”

In Drevsjo, Norway, Bjare Granli’s woodpile is a fisherman’s dream. {source}

The Vermont Spiral

Woodstock, Vermont woodworker Ken Woodhead created a shape that spreads out and lifts up in a perfect spiral. {source}

Feeling inspired to get creative with your wood stack? Tag your photos on Facebook or Instagram with #woodstackskills for a chance to be featured on our blog and social outlets!